Fairmont Hotels Share the Ecobricking

Blog post from Russell Maier, Bali Indonesia

So this is pretty awesome.  It just so happened that the conference that I attended in Jakarta last week was hosted at the Jakarta Fairmont– you may have seen my posts over the last year that the Fairmont Sanur Bali has been pioneering full ecobrick implementation.  It was too interesting a coincidence to pass up.

img_1928Every month each employee at the Fairmont Bali, from the security guards to the GM, makes one ecobrick from their department’s plastic.  They now have many ecobricks and modules.

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Soooo… on the way to the airport for the conference, I picked up a modulefrom Wirati the head of the Fairmont Sanur’s Environment Committee.  I let the Fairmont Jakarta know that we had a gift for them.

At the conclusion of the Jakarta conference, the GM of the Fairmont Jakarta, found time to make it up to our hall and meet me.  I was able to hand over to Carlios a Fairmont Bali ecobrick module as a gift. Of course, I also explained how their sister hotel has implemented ecobricks as a way  to go zero waste.

Inspired and intrigued… Carlos is already talking about how they can emulate this at the Fairmonth Jakarta.  The trash transformation virus spreads!

 

Abdul Rohman vs Al Gore

Pak Abdul Rohman is a hands down eco-hero. In many ways, he is way ahead of Al Gore in practically helping the planet’s health.

I met Pak Rohman during our Ecobrick Training of Trainers workshop this September in Jakarta. He sat in the back quietly, but I remember him being particularly attentive. He wasn’t an official attendee– he was the parking attendant of the NU building in which we were holding the workshop!

Determined, he persuaded his boss to let him attend. He sat in for our training whenever he could squeeze a moment between guiding cars and motorcycles.

15156912_10210212887472863_3967570633272588636_oAfter work every day Pak Abdul segregates, washes, dries, then packs his household plastic into bottles.  Now that that has run out of plastic in his house (he doesn’t consume nearly as much these days) he buys clean plastic from his neighbors. That’s right… He personally buys it! 2000Rp per kg of mixed otherwise unrecyclable plastic that he knows will otherwise be dumped and burned in the community.

Often I hear advice from folks in NGOs, thinking from the capitalist paradigm, who think it will be necessary to buy Ecobricks from people to motivate them. It’s always tricky to explain how money is actually unnecessary hindrance: there are far more potent human motivations than capital gain. Pak Abdul is a great example!

Living in Jakarta, he sees all the plastic that goes through his house, that of his neighbors and the city. It doesn’t take a college degree to see the plastic in the ditch, rivers and dumpsites and know that our supporting ecologies ain’t doing so good. “I started ecobricking to protect the environment from getting destroyed. I am worried about that all the plastic is going to clog the drains and rivers in my community”.

Of the 40 participants at our training, Pak Rohman is the first to submit in his Ecobricks to the Jakarta NU office (I will bring mine in this. He had to park cars during the part of our workshop where we made modules– so here you seem him, proudly logging his Ecobricks into the NUBrick App and learning to make hexagon modules with silicone.

15069073_10210212880552690_8425606521903432914_oPak Rohman is hero. Not only has gone not only zero waste, he’s gone negative-waste. “I’ve shown my son how to Ecobrick, and I taught his class and school how to Ecobrick also”.  Every Friday, he hosts an ecobrick party at his house, where he invites his neighbours to pack plastic with him. According to the NUBrick App he has personally packed over 30 ecobricks, a total of almost 10kgs of plastic in the last two months alone.  This amounts to sequestering over 30kgs of C02.  Of course, this isn’t counting all the ecobricks made by the students he has gone on to train!

15137671_10210212880992701_8706030866120235894_oThis is the power of non-capital, mandalic collaboration to incite viral transformative and consciousness raising movements of activated eco-heroes like Pak Rohman.

If everyone flew around on air planes like Al Gore our planet would quickly choke on CO2. If everyone packed more plastic (read C02) than they consumed, like Pak Mohamad, then wow… Pollution would literally be a thing of the past.


Next month:  Pak Rohman is one of 40 NU trainers.  We will build a garden with Pak Abdul’s and NU’s Ecobricks…

EcoBricks workshop with Yayasan Anak in Singaraja, Bali, August 2016

Back in August, then-new GEA EcoBricks trainers Carly and Bebe hosted a workshop with about 30 youth and 10 staff at Yayasan Anak Bali’s center in Singaraja, on the north coast of Bali.

Yayasan Anak, founded in 2002, has a mission to empower talented children by covering their school fees, offering cultural activities working with medical checkups, and providing a place to live when needed.

In addition, at its many centers throughout Bali, the organization invites guest presenters to empower the kids in understanding global issues to become leaders of tomorrow. The EcoBricks workshop followed a talk by education specialist Dr. Made Hery on the importance of integrity and grit in leadership. Throughout the process of learning about plastic and packing ecobricks, the Yayasan Anak staff reinforced the idea that leadership and integrity in today’s world involves taking responsibility for not only our own waste, but in pioneering ideas and models of stewardship throughout the community.

After the fun 4-hour workshop, kids, staff, and presenters all took turns singing and playing guitar. The singing continued in a packed car on the three-hour ride home to Ubud.

For Carly, the EcoBricks workshop really underscored the importance of building community through enjoying the process of working together. “I’ve been involved in the EcoBricks movement for more than a year now, and have often focused on exploring EcoBricks as a medium of connecting with our individual and collective consumer shadow side. This was the first time I had worked with EcoBricks and kids. I loved the opportunity to reconnect with EcoBricks as a medium of play, as a lighthearted way of addressing these huge global issues. And I loved becoming a part of the joyful Yayasan Anak community!”

Even though Bebe had never heard of the practice in the Philippines of writing a vision for the future on each bottle, he observed after the workshop, “Each bottle represents a hope. When we bring all of these bottles together into one project, all of these hopes together into one place, all these pieces of a vision for a regenerative future, that’s building community.”

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